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The 28 Motives

The Motives CircumplexTM

The Motives Circumplex identifies the psychological, emotional, and social needs, what we call motives, that are the foundation for well-being at work. Meeting these human needs is vital for a thriving professional life and a people-first culture. We uncovered 28 motives that create a work life well-lived. The data for these motives placed our variables into 10 overarching factors, the 10 Motive Domains. We’ve named these Domains based on the shared qualities of the motives within them. 

Of course, motives won’t appeal equally to any one individual; a few motives rise to the top for each one of us, and those are our key emotional and behavioral drivers in this season of our lives. That’s why we developed the Motives Met Human Needs AssessmentTM  to empower individuals, teams, and leaders to identify what matters most.

 

3 Things to Understand About Motives

 

1. There Are No Favorites

Motives Met, by nature of the data behind it, is an unbiased assessment. All motives are created equal, they are all positive and core components of work wellness, no motive is better than another. While we can all need these things to be well and perform well at work, we don’t need them to the same degree in the same way in the same season.  No one motive or combination of motives, or path to try and meet those motives, guarantees a great work life or an exceptional company. Exceptional workplaces and work relationships embrace motive diversity. All motives are worthy and support wellbeing but everyone’s top motives are different, valid, and deserve to be met.

2. Your Wellbeing is About Your Most Important Motives Right Now

If a motive isn’t in your top 5, it doesn’t mean that it isn’t important to you. It just isn’t one of your deepest needs or sources of motivation in this season. The Motives Met assessment shines a spotlight on the top motives that require your greatest attention, the ones you need ot honor, protect and strengthen the most. While motives don’t change rapidly, motives can change with time, evolving as aspects of your life and career evolve. This assessment measures what is most important to you right now.

3. Wellbeing is Personal, Not A One-Size-Fits-All

Meeting motives takes individualized consideration. Two people can have the same motive, but with very different reasons for why it matters to them, and with different ways it can be best supported and met. These results provide broad, helpful tips and best practices to begin meeting motives. To be most effective, you have to also understand the individual. This is true whether you’re using this assessment to better support yourself or to learn about and support others.

The Motives CircumplexTM

Achievement Personal Strengths Clear Expectations Peer Appreciation Company Appreciation Self-Esteem Peer Connection Community Fun Manager Support Security Calmness Fairness Work/Life Harmony Balanced Pace Shared Culture Prestige Trustworthy Leadership Passion Purpose Growth Challenge Future Success Variety Innovation Flexibility Autonomy Free Expression

success

The Success Domain is characterized by a drive for positive outcomes, believing goals are attainable, and a feeling of competency.

ACHIEVEMENT
PERSONAL STRENGTHS
CLEAR EXPECTATIONS
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

ACHIEVEMENT

As someone with the ACHIEVEMENT motive, you take satisfaction from a sense of forward motion, and from a sense of confidence in your ability to meet your goals. You want your efforts to meet your potential. The ACHIEVEMENT motive shares a relationship with ambition; this motive is sometimes tied to specific, success-related goals and sometimes to more general, day-to-day feelings of ACHIEVEMENT. Success is particular and personal, and your definition of success will determine what ACHIEVEMENT you need most. When you meet this motive head-on, your energy soars and you can go above and beyond in the face of challenging setbacks. Because you want to achieve at work, you likely hold yourself to a high standard. The motivation you receive from ACHIEVEMENT hinges on your sense of competence, and the intrinsic reward of excelling at what matters to you. When you feel like you excel, you’re a force to be reckoned with and you enjoy your job. If you are unable to achieve success as you define it for extended periods of time, it will impact your well-being and drive. Small touch-points of accomplishment and excellence in your work week go a long way towards maintaining your energy and setting you up to thrive to the best of your ability.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Achievement

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Achievement

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

PERSONAL STRENGTHS

As someone with the PERSONAL STRENGTHS motive, you thrive when you can focus on what you do best. The desire to use your strengths doesn’t mean that you aren’t willing to learn something new or challenge your weaknesses, but you are liable to become demotivated if you’re habitually required to complete tasks that are outside of your dominant skillset. You prefer to invest in known growth areas and in your natural talents. In the long term, you may enjoy work that pushes you towards being a master or an expert rather than a jack-of-all-trades. PERSONAL STRENGTHS is in the Success Domain, and being able to maximize your talents is critical to your sense and definition of success. It also plays a critical role in your experience of professional wellbeing, both practically and emotionally. When you’re allowed to lead with your strengths, not only are you much more content, but you capitalize on those strengths to the benefit of everyone who works with you.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Personal Strengths

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Personal Strengths

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

CLEAR EXPECTATIONS

When the need for CLEAR EXPECTATIONS is of top importance it means you’ll be most engaged and happy at work when goals and standards are well-defined and well-articulated. When your CLEAR EXPECTATIONS motive is met, you’re confident that you’re on the path to where you want to go. The impact of this confidence on your productivity and well-being is profound. You thrive when you know what you need to do to succeed in the short and long-term, and you work best when you understand how your performance will be measured. You enjoy having clarity in your work life because it empowers you to feel like success is attainable: a fixed, reasonable target, rather than a moving one. Confusion about objectives or unclear delegation of tasks frustrates you and impedes your focus and productivity. You value responsibility and ownership; you don’t want to let yourself or others down. For you, guessing at standards or expectations is discouraging and a waste of mental energy. You prefer to be proactive and are gratified by the completion of foreseeable and clearly articulated goals.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Clear Expectations

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Clear Expectations

company connection

The Company Connection Domain is rooted in the need to feel a strong connection and affinity with the organization you are a part of.

SHARED CULTURE
PRESTIGE
TRUSTWORTHY LEADERSHIP
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

SHARED CULTURE

When you value SHARED CULTURE, you derive energy from a workplace culture that feels familiar, comfortable, and affirming. Your ideal SHARED CULTURE may look like a bustling startup that values freedom in decision-making, or you may thrive in the atmosphere of an established, well-oiled machine. The culture points that matter most to you are personal. Whatever the particulars, you desire a good fit between your own style and the company vibe. Meshing well with people, beliefs and protocols helps you feel connected in a meaningful way. A company’s culture encompasses three areas: cognitive culture (shared beliefs, values, and vision), emotional culture (overall mood, how people feel at work, and how they suppress or express emotion), and behavioral culture (behavioral norms, and which behaviors or inactions are tolerated or rejected). If you are out of sync with those of your brand or workplace in any or all three of these areas, this motive will suffer and you are likely to lessen the connection that creates a healthy mutually beneficial relationship between you and your company. You want to feel like you and your company are a good match, that your well-being matters, and that the relationship you have with your company is reciprocal. Being part of a culture and workplace you admire and take pride in elevates your happiness and emotional satisfaction. When this motive is strong it also enhances your motivation to help your company succeed and to add to the work culture in positive ways.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Shared Culture

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Shared Culture

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

PRESTIGE

finds PRESTIGE to be of top importance, you desire to do work, or work for a company, you hold in high esteem and regard. If your workplace or own company has integrity and industry influence, this helps you to feel confident that you’re giving your time and effort to something worthwhile. You like to feel that the positive qualities of your organization reflect well on you. The more positive qualities your company, brand or work has, the more proud and motivated you feel about your work. Maintaining an admirable relationship with your company is key, but within that relationship, the PRESTIGE motive can be satisfied in multiple and diverse ways. These ways vary from person to person. One PRESTIGE-driven individual may thrive working for a well-established company that has a household brand name, while someone else may feel more fulfilled working for a less-known company whose mission or impact is nonetheless meaningful, innovative, or reputable. PRESTIGE may lie in your ability to work with the best in your field; or you may be most motivated when you feel your company’s credibility and success affirm your own. Regardless of the details of your relationship with PRESTIGE, you are energized when your work and workplace has an admirable and positive impact and reputation. You may feel deeply unsettled if your company or brand’s image falters, if its credibility comes into question, or if its success is compromised. You invest most and feel best when your organization maintains an exceptional performance and authentic image and you consistently feel proud of the work you do.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Prestige Summary

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Prestige Summary

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

TRUSTWORTHY LEADERSHIP

Having the TRUSTWORTHY LEADERSHIP motive means you are most confident and driven when the leaders in your workplace or whom you work with are competent, care about their employees, and are worthy of your belief in them. It is demotivating for you if your leaders or others (whether they actually supervise or direct you, or are merely influential peers or partners) prove unreliable, incapable, neglectful, and untrustworthy. Lack of TRUSTWORTHY LEADERSHIP will affect your attitude at work, and your ability and desire to remain productive and engaged. You are inspired to follow and learn from people who possess qualities you associate with strong leadership. These qualities may include transparency, vulnerability, passion, or other aspects of integrity that speak to your values. This motive may even be important to you because you strive to be a trusted leader with these qualities yourself. Leaders support this motive when they can be authentic, and when they treat employees with respect as fellow human beings. You are happiest and most productive when you’re able to admire the leaders in your work life. You do best working at a company where leadership has a good reputation, and lives up to it. You thrive when you can trust these people, and when they have proven that they care for your well-being and the well-being of your peers.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Trustworthy Leadership

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Trustworthy Leadership

meaning

The Meaning Domain connects to your deeper sense of self, who you are, what's important, and how you see the world around you.

PASSION
PURPOSE
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

PASSION

Having the PASSION motive means you are driven to seek work with which you have an inspired connection, and which allows you to experience joy, excitement, and even positive frustration. Living your best work life means genuinely liking the work you do, feeling personally invested in it, and being immersed in tasks that engage your sense of meaning. Having this motive in your top 5 signifies a deep and resonant value for PASSION, not necessarily current possession of PASSION. You may already thrive through the practice of living out your professional passions, or you may be in a season of discovery, with the desire to discover where your passions are. A narrow but common understanding says that people have just one or two passions in life, and that passions are a thing to be found. This motive is broader than that and meets you in work that matters to you, specific to your own values. Thus, people can easily have multiple passions and can also develop passions deliberately. However you relate to PASSION, you need heart as well as head reasons for being engaged and well at work. You’re capable of profound enthusiasm and want to channel that enthusiasm into your work when your passions match professional goals. In the short-term, you may be capable of performing work that doesn’t much matter to you, but in the long-term, you are liable to feel demotivated, and as if the best version of yourself and your work life is somewhere else.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Passion

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Passion

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

PURPOSE

​​When you are driven by PURPOSE, you derive energy and inspiration from the sense that your work fulfills a deeper meaning in your life. PURPOSE, along with PASSION, is in the Meaning Domain. Although we all share a need to pursue meaning in our lives, for you meaning is a vital component to thrive at work. You may seek work that you feel you are “meant” to do and that aligns closely with your values. Practically speaking, you like a job that entails tasks or projects that make a worthwhile impact on something that matters to you or others. You will likely be most fulfilled when at least some facet of your work life feels like a “calling” or part of who you are. At the same time, because you are deeply oriented toward seeing meaning, you are likely to find PURPOSE even in roles or tasks that you would not necessarily consider your calling. You can feel purposeful in small but significant ways. When your PURPOSE motive is engaged, you not only have a healthier outlook on your career, but feel motivated to achieve your work-related goals. When your work relates to your sense of PURPOSE, you are more resilient to stress and more smoothly overcome failure. When a sense of PURPOSE is absent, you may feel aimless, anxious, or find yourself demotivated or vulnerable to apathy. You want to love the “why” behind the work you do each day. For your best quality work life, you need to feel like the work you’re doing means something significant to you or to the larger world.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Purpose

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Purpose

advancement

The Advancement Domain embodies a drive for personal potential and continued devolvement.

GROWTH
CHALLENGE
FUTURE SUCCESS
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

GROWTH

As someone who values GROWTH in their work lifeyou’re inclined toward new opportunities and possibilities. While you may be a life-long learner or someone who values GROWTH overall in multiple areas of your life, this motive often connects specifically with desired advancement in your career. Growing in meaningful ways will help you reach your goals and desired milestones. You enjoy when your work life provides you with general feelings of development and with opportunities to grow professionally, and perhaps even personally. You dislike complacency and a sense of stagnation. You are attracted to the expansion garnered from new or challenging experiences, and you enjoy the process and result of that expansion. Acquiring new skills and knowledge proves you’re making progress, not just in the short-term, but in your long-term sense of professional self-development. You tend to have a strong sense of your own potential (which, under demotivated circumstances, you can lose), and you are ready to pursue it. This can translate into having a similar insight into your organization or team’s potential: you like to see those you work with improve and grow too. You want to learn new things and may even desire becoming an expert or leader in a particular area. When GROWTH is a primary motive, one threat you may face is boredom or monotony. You can struggle when your position lacks space for expansion or room to pursue your goals. When this motive is engaged, it can make your job one of your favorite places to grow.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Growth

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Growth

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

CHALLENGE

As someone who desires a CHALLENGE, you feel driven by work that stretches you within your desirable difficulty. For some, this motive manifests as a natural enjoyment of overcoming obstacles. For others, the CHALLENGE motive can surface if you’ve felt under-challenged, bored or are trying to expand in new directions. You may be drawn to professional opportunities that require the best of you and push the boundaries of your potential, ultimately bringing you closer to your goals. The need for CHALLENGE means you are less inclined to remain in “comfort zones.” You are likely to believe that rising to meet challenges leads to improvement, grit, confidence and resilience. Phrased differently, you see challenges as opportunities. To you, achieving a difficult or new task feels like personal or professional growth. You value advancement, and so this motive is at risk if you feel stalled in your work or your fear of failure overshadows you. If you are performing well but feel you are stagnating rather than progressing, it will take a negative toll. Without rising to meet new challenges you may feel opportunities for advancement will be limited. While failure can be disheartening at times, attempting something difficult of value and not accomplishing it perfectly supports this motive, rather than doing something that doesn’t CHALLENGE and interest you. You will be most engaged in work that pushes you in a meaningful and achievable way. Working hard without any success for too long will demotivate you, just as it would demotivate anyone, even if you are able to persist in the struggle longer than many of your peers. Never resting between challenges – even if they are challenges you enjoy – can threaten this motive as well. When your CHALLENGE motive is healthy, you experience the emotional benefits of growing personally and advancing professionally.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Challenge

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Challenge

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

FUTURE SUCCESS

As someone with the FUTURE SUCCESS motive, your need to succeed relates to your larger potential, goals, and career aspirations. For you, feeling you are on the path to FUTURE SUCCESS is key to feeling positive and optimistic in your work life. You want to feel you are advancing at work in ways that matter to you, which is why this motive is in the Advancement Domain, rather than the Success Domain. Work that supports your personal vision for FUTURE SUCCESS tends to be the most compelling for you. While you may still enjoy incremental moments of success each day, this motive may allow you to delay gratification for the sake of a bigger picture. You want to be forward-thinking and strategic, with the long game in mind. You likely have specific end goals that hinge on your unique sense of professional advancement, but clearly defined goals are not always necessary for this motive. You enjoy a feeling of forward momentum in your work life, regardless of whether your aspirations are specific, or more broad. Feeling like you are generally progressing in your career path can be enough to fill this need even if you don’t have all the details regarding the FUTURE SUCCESS you desire ironed out. Your motivation peaks when you believe the work you’re doing and the skills you’re developing will pay dividends and lead to favorable outcomes later down the road. If you cannot see a relationship between the tasks and hours you spend at work today and where you hope to be tomorrow, your well-being will suffer. When this motive is met you feel the success you desire is possible, and you are more resilient and driven to overcome challenges and expand your capabilities.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Future Success

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Future Success

stimulation

The Stimulation Domain encompasses the desire for intellectually challenging work that offers diversity and encourages creativity.

VARIETY
INNOVATION
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

VARIETY

Novelty is the foundation of the VARIETY motive: you don’t want to do the same thing all of the time. VARIETY is in the Stimulation Domain, alongside the INNOVATION motive. You are driven to perform when your work engages your interest and enthusiasm. You like to change things up, and are not easily intimidated by a task just because you haven’t done it before. Your ideal work scenario allows you to collect varied experiences, and won’t trap you in one process or project. If you do end up operating within one skill set, you enjoy having multiple and diverse applications for it. You resist the idea of an unbending routine. Similarly, you’re demotivated and discontent in monotonous environments or cultures that prize uniformity. Having the VARIETY motive doesn’t mean you don’t want certainty or dependability in certain areas of your work life, or that you aren’t organized and thoughtful in how you spend your effort and time. Rather, you likely enjoy learning and exploration, and this motive keeps you alert to the excitement of a little professional uncertainty. Too much certainty and routine can cause even meaningful work to begin to feel mundane, tedious, or boring to you. You want to keep your work life fresh and dynamic. This can mean variation in your tasks, in the people or places you encounter, in your routine, or in the positive professional challenges that you face. Regardless of where it manifests, VARIETY is a key part of your happiness and fulfillment at work.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Variety

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Variety

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

INNOVATION

As someone with the need for INNOVATION, you might also see yourself defined by a need for creativity or originality. As INNOVATION is one of two motives in the Stimulation Domain (alongside VARIETY), this motive will drive you to perform best in situations that actively engage your interest, enthusiasm, and curiosity. The INNOVATION motive draws on an intrinsic need to develop, explore, and stretch your mind. You derive fulfillment from getting to experiment and try new things, and your well-being can suffer in purely conservative or close-minded environments. You thrive when your workplace sees failure and mistakes as rungs on the ladder to success, rather than as barriers. Left uninhibited, you are likely to resist conformity and complacency in favor of growth and change. For this reason, you may have a higher threshold for risk-taking and for pushing boundaries. Your unique outlook inspires you to take chances. You seek to improve your world, trusting your intuition to come up with the ideas to do it. You like to create, not just implement. You do your best work, and feel the most satisfied, when those you work with appreciate the fresh thinking, creativity, and resourcefulness you bring to the table.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Innovation

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Innovation

freedom

The Freedom Domain is driven by the need for empowerment and self-determination.

FLEXIBILITY
AUTONOMY
FREE EXPRESSION
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

FLEXIBILITY

As someone with the need for FLEXIBILITY, you deeply value having options regarding how and when you work. As a motive, FLEXIBILITY is a close cousin of AUTONOMYwith the shared desire for self-determination. Micromanagement drains your energy, and rigid work environments or schedules and excessive guidelines and busyness can demotivate you and push you to disengage. You are significantly more energized and productive when you have the power to shape your work life in ways that allow you to perform your best. This may look like freedom to build your own schedule, determine your own methods, select where you work, what you wear or to choose your own clients and collaborators. You like to have choices – both big-picture and in your day-to-day – and you feel most capable and at ease in work situations that are accommodating and adaptable. FLEXIBILITY has some emotional overlap with the WORK/LIFE HARMONY motive, and you may value FLEXIBILITY because it empowers you to meet obligations outside of work and gives you space to meet your other motives. You resist too much structure, especially where you feel it is unnecessary because structure can keep things (schedules, expectations, goals, business norms, professional relationships) from being able to evolve and bend when they need to. A meaningful facet of FLEXIBILITY is the capacity to bend without breaking. You value your freedom to bend because you see freedom and adaptability as key to your ability to excel in a healthy way.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for FLEXIBILITY

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for AUTONOMY

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

AUTONOMY

Thriving with AUTONOMY means you do best when you have a strong sense of self-determination. You want to feel genuine pride and ownership of the work you do, and you need a meaningful degree of control and self-government to perform to your potential. You tend to have a strong desire for psychological ownership, feeling a personal sense of responsibility and that you have a stake in your work and its outcomes. The AUTONOMY motive shares key characteristics with the FLEXIBILITY motive, both of which are in the Freedom Domain. When you have choices about how, when, and with whom you work, you invest your full attention in whatever you do. Although the extent of the AUTONOMY you need will be unique, it will likely concern the strategic direction for your role, and how you set your own goals. You want leeway to depend on your own judgment, bring new ideas to the table, weigh options, and draw on your own knowledge and experience. You invest less, especially emotionally, when someone else defines your day-to-day tasks or routine, and when your position requires you simply to do as you’re directed. Micromanagement and any feelings of professional powerlessness discourage and demotivate you, you want to have an emotional experience of your work being “yours.” You want freedom to shape your work life so that you can contribute your best. You enjoy self-reliance, and you value your ability to make sound decisions and to accomplish what you need to do. You tend to trust yourself, and you feel best when your colleagues and superiors can also trust and value your AUTONOMY.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for AUTONOMY

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for AUTONOMY

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

FREE EXPRESSION

If you have the FREE EXPRESSION motive, it means that you are energized by professional dynamics that are open, welcoming to communication and have strong psychological safety. You value hearing and being heard, even when your opinion goes against the grain. Especially vital to your well-being is a work environment that allows expression equally, regardless of rank or status in the organization. You don’t want to waste effort, time, or energy hiding who you are or what you think. Instead, you perform best when you and those around you can dialogue without facing negative consequences. You like an uninhibited, transparent, and open culture, based in mutual trust between colleagues (and leaders). You find candor validating and energizing, even when it lengthens processes in the short term. Either implicitly or explicitly, you believe that a group of people who listens to one another and engages a diverse array of ideas and voices shares power and creates better outcomes. When it comes to work-related decisions, you don’t feel compelled to grasp for control. You do, however, feel the need to have your say when you feel your perspective is relevant. You, and your motivation at work, suffer when you are bullied, discounted, or stifled. The more open to expression and dialogue your work environment, the more comfortable you are, and the freer you feel to work your best.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for AUTONOMY

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for AUTONOMY

balance

The Balance Domain aims to achieve a harmonious distribution of time tailored to your needs, balancing professional responsibilities with personal pursuits.

WORK/LIFE HARMONY
BALANCED PACE
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

WORK/LIFE HARMONY

Having the WORK-LIFE HARMONY motive indicates you have a core desire for a well-rounded life. The desired balance and equilibrium between work and personal time will manifest uniquely for each individual. It isn’t, however, about striving for a perfect balance between work and life, but the desire for them to harmonize rather than be at odds with one another. You may prefer that “work” and “life” be separate, or you may prefer to integrate and synergize them on your terms. Separation often looks like clear boundaries between “work time” and “personal time.” Integration may look like a flexible start time; bringing your dog to work; running a personal errand during the work day; or answering emails later in the evening, after a workout or a child’s soccer game. The desire for WORK-LIFE HARMONY does not make your dedication to professionalism less. Rather, you acknowledge your work life as part of a larger whole. WORK/LIFE HARMONY is in the Balance Domain, which is next to the Freedom Domain on the Motive Circumplex. You are motivated by freedom to prioritize your time and design your work life in a way that integrates and harmonizes with other areas of your life. When you have the freedom to approach your life as a whole, you perform more efficiently in the professional sphere. You lose motivation when your work consistently inhibits your ability to give necessary attention, time, or energy to other areas that matter to you. It benefits you to have clear boundaries with your job. This can be complex to navigate if you have other top motives that keep you professionally driven (like a motive in the Success, Meaning, or Advancement Domains). Even the most dedicated professionals who have the WORK-LIFE HARMONY motive excel more consistently when they hold a margin of time and space removed from work. You risk becoming resentful if you push these boundaries or if those you work with cross them repeatedly. Even if your ideal harmony isn’t always possible, you value working with others who support the importance of this motive. When you have time and energy to invest in priorities outside of work, you can maintain productivity and invest your full attention at work. When this motive is met your work life and personal life reinforce one another.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Worklife Harmony

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Worklife Harmony

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

BALANCED PACE

Having the BALANCED PACE motive means you’re most satisfied and at ease when your workday fits into a rhythm that feels optimal to you. BALANCED PACE is in the Balance Domain along with the WORK-LIFE HARMONY motive. For some, having an optimal pace helps support the balance you are seeking in their work and personal life. This motive is not about working fast or slow specifically, or not having deadlines to meet. Rather, having the BALANCED PACE motive indicates your desire to meet work responsibilities with enough attention and margin left to catch errors, enjoy your process, and review progress and results. The exact pacing will be specific to you. You may be the fastest-working person on your team, or you may be one of the most moderated. In either case, if you often have to compromise quality, mental health, or your own equilibrium for the sake of speed, other people’s pacing, or tight timelines, you’re going to be frustrated and discouraged. You prefer a margin for meeting expectations and perform to the best of your abilities when you can balance your tasks with your own sense of pace. For this reason, rush jobs, unreasonable urgency, and unrealistic deadlines (especially if this is the constant norm) are demotivating to you. Your productivity thrives in rhythms that allow you to tackle professional goals with holistic consideration so you can perform at your best.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Balanced Pace

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Balanced Pace

comfort

SECURITY
CALMNESS
FAIRNESS
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

SECURITY

As an individual with the SECURITY motive, you have a distinct need to feel secure in your work life. SECURITY, whether emotional and psychological, or financial and physical (or all of them together) is one of the keystones to your motivation and being well at work. Psychological safety may look like working in an environment that’s free of excessive criticism, where you can be yourself, and where people aren’t unfairly punished for mistakes or disagreements. Financial SECURITY likely includes seeing a stable financial future for yourself and being reasonably assured of ongoing employment. Of course, everyone wants SECURITY to some extent. Having SECURITY as a motive however, means your well-being is directly contingent upon the degree to which you feel like the things that matter to you are protected. You are demotivated and discouraged by workplaces that penalize employees out of hand, or in situations where things you hope would be consistent or safe feel out of control. You want a foundation of SECURITY at work that leaves you without many reasons to worry or doubt. You’re attracted to workplaces that support good rapport between management and employees, and you feel energized when trust and communication make your job SECURITY clear. Stability invigorates you and preserves you from undue stress and anxiety. When you have SECURITY you have the mental capacity to perform with enthusiasm and attention. When you don’t, both your professional and personal well-being suffer. If this motive is severely at risk, your ability to meet your other top motives may be as well. Look at how your personal definition of SECURITY is met; when it is, you are productive and deeply dependable.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Security

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Security

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

CALMNESS

Your CALMNESS motive indicates the desire to have a healthy relationship with stress in your work life. You want to feel at ease and comfortable at work or, at the very least, avoid chronic stress and overwhelm. You may thrive in more relaxed work environments with easy-going peers. Or perhaps not-so-paradoxically, you may gravitate to fast-paced high pressure challenging work roles. Regardless of the equilibrium you seek, toxic rush, emotional exhaustion, constant busyness, broken boundaries, incessant worry and a persistent atmosphere of unrest will inhibit you from experiencing the CALMNESS you need at work. It’s likely you care about your well-being and the well-being of others and know when this motive is threatened it can lead to burnout and take a toll on your mental and physical health. You enjoy working in situations where you can manage your own pace, drama is minimal, and you feel your work demands are manageable. This motive does not mean you are unable to handle stress or expect your work to be stress-free, but if your sense of peace is constantly disrupted and work becomes a place of continued discomfort and tension it will inhibit your satisfaction and productivity. You may still enjoy job roles that aren’t naturally calm, or a fun and social work dynamic, but you perform most effectively in a workplace and work relationships that maintain respect for the CALMNESS motive. The more you can be relaxed at work and experience calm in the chaos, the more engaged and happy you will be.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Calmness

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Calmness

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

FAIRNESS

Having FAIRNESS as a core motive means justice and equality are key incentives and values for you in the workplace. All human beings have a strong desire for relational FAIRNESS. As someone with FAIRNESS as a motive, your sensitivity is heightened. You are motivated at work when you can see equal treatment, clarity, and transparency in decision-making. This motive also drives your belief that others are responsible for treating one another honorably and respectfully. The FAIRNESS motive can manifest as down-to-earth and practical, or as fiercely principled and idealistic (and sometimes both at once). FAIRNESS is in the Comfort Domain, because one dimension of comfort is the guarantee that you will be treated with respect, rewarded proportionate to the work you do, and free from discrimination or favoritism. When it comes to opportunities, you want everyone to have a fair chance. You dislike workplace politics and maneuvering. You like to know your responsibilities and the expectations of your company, and you’re encouraged when you know the rules won’t be disregarded or mismanaged. You work your best when you feel valued, and when you can see that you’re evaluated on the same rubrics as your peers. You dislike favoritism, bias, and anything else that elevates one person over another for reasons besides their efforts and performance. Your sense of well-being is strongest in a professional setting that breaks down barriers to equal opportunities, avoids cliques, and promotes equity. When you feel your work situation is fair, you are loyal, committed, and strive to add as much value as possible.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Fairness

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Fairness

personal connection

The Personal Connection Domain stems from the innate human need for social interaction and meaningful inclusive relationships.

PEER CONNECTION
COMMUNITY
FUN
MANAGER SUPPORT
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

PEER CONNECTION

Valuing PEER CONNECTION, means for you work isn’t just about work  – it’s also about people. Positive interactions ground you, increase your focus, and keep you interested in your job. You like to engage with colleagues, managers, fellow-freelancers, customers, or clients on a personal level. You struggle when you don’t get along with your collaborators, or if your position keeps you isolated. You may take energy from social interaction, or you may more simply enjoy a sense of professional solidarity. This motive doesn’t mean you’re compelled to be friends with everyone, though you’ll likely prefer to work among at least a few friends. The connections you enjoy at work may be deep or casual, many or few. It’s likely you possess a basic friendliness and curiosity about others, and you appreciate it when your attention is reciprocated. You thrive when your instinct to connect helps build your team and drives good business. Negative relationships (or an absence of relationships), however, will leave you disengaged. Whether introverted or extroverted, you enjoy work that allows you to exercise interpersonal muscles. You thrive in a collaborative environment with positive personal connections you value. When you have beneficial relationships in your work life, you enjoy your work that much more and have greater motivation to support others.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Peer Connection

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Peer Connection

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

COMMUNITY

As someone with the BELONGING motive, you desire a deeper sense of solidarity and inclusion at work. You likely naturally develop relationships in your professional network, because work isn’t just about work for you; it’s about people. You are happiest and most engaged in situations where you can bond with clients, customers, or colleagues beyond the surface level in ways that matter to you. The need to belong is hardwired into our DNA as humans, but for you feeling accepted and respected for your true self and meaningfully connected at work is especially beneficial for your well-being. It’s important to you that in your workplace and work relationships people are accepted for who they are regardless of things like personal beliefs, race, gender or age. Working for a company and leaders who value a culture of BELONGING for everyone, with diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) efforts that are purposeful and effective, will elevate your health and happiness at work. If you feel excluded by others, isolated or that your “work self” and “real self” need to be vastly different, it will harm your sense of BELONGING. You thrive and engage most deeply when you feel you are part of a work community, small or large, where trust, vulnerability, connection, and support are strong.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Community

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Community

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

FUN

As someone motivated by FUN, you resist the narrative that work and play must always be separate. Your motivation is highest when your workplace keeps a lighter tone, rather than a stressed or somber one. While all of the 28 motives connect to a longing for happiness, the FUN motive is perhaps the most overt in this pursuit. You believe that people can be serious, productive, and happy, and you don’t just want to be productive and happy in isolation. FUN is in the Personal Connection Domain. This means that, while you may enjoy FUN for FUN’s sake, you also want to have a good time with other people. This makes you a natural (and often unintentional) team-builder. When permitted, your desire for FUN builds connection with your peers, and can even help create an environment of emotional safety. Though FUN may look like frivolity or distraction to some people not as driven by it, it’s just as important to being well at work as any other motive. You have the mindset that everyone does and feels better when they can find some FUN in what they do. You like to find FUN in your responsibilities as well as in your environment. You are most engaged when laughter, play, and lightheartedness are a part of your dynamic at work. You work best in environments that allow you both to feel and to share a sense of joy and FUN. 

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Fun

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Fun

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

MANAGER SUPPORT

Being driven by MANAGER SUPPORT means you excel when your supervisor or manager consistently demonstrates that they care about your success and your well-being. You thrive when you can maintain mutual respect and compatibility with your leaders. While this motive is called MANAGER SUPPORT, a manager or entrepreneur is just as likely to have this motive as anyone else. Whatever your role, you need the support of those above you; those you tend to follow or who influence you; or the person leading a current project or dimension of your work. You value leadership that sees you, believes in you, is available to you, and has your back. You may have this motive because being such a leader to your people is important to you. Inaccessible, aloof, punitive, incompetent, or highly critical bosses will, by default, sabotage your sense of work wellness, and your motivation. By the same token, you see an invested manager who takes an interest in your life and career as an influential part of your success. If they are just as interested in your long-term success as short-term, even better. When management trusts you, they reinforce your confidence. The more positive and stable your relationship with those above you, the more fulfilled you are and the better you engage and perform.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Manager Support

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Manager Support

significance

The Significance Domain represents the need to feel valued, matter, and make meaningful contributions.

PEER APPRECIATION
COMPANY APPRECIATION
SELF-ESTEEM
Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

PEER APPRECIATION

As someone who values PEER APPRECIATION, genuine gratitude is a powerful force. This motive is part of the Significance Domain, which acknowledges the human need to be noticed and valued, even (or especially) in professional spaces. You are fueled by recognition and by constructive feedback from your peers. The kind of appreciation that nurtures you most may be public recognition, or a private thank-you; or you may feel most appreciated when someone gives you their time or requests that you join their project or team. However you most meaningfully receive it, constructive feedback helps you focus confidently on your strengths and daily tasks, especially when the source is a fellow collaborator or someone you admire. On the Motives Circumplex, the Significance Domain is next to the Personal Connection Domain. Displays of gratitude help you feel connected to your work and your peers, and this connection enhances your well-being. Your motivation may fail if you feel your presence or your contribution is taken for granted or viewed as insignificant. You want to positively contribute at work and appreciation signals to you that you’re doing a good job, and that you are adding value to the people you work with. You thrive in a work dynamic where it is normal to show appreciation and gratitude for what everyone brings to the table and who they are. This doesn’t mean you can’t work solo, but if and when you do, having an outlet to share your work and experience with others in your field helps to keep you motivated. If you work for yourself but have clients, client appreciation may help meet this need.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Peer Appreciation

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Peer Appreciation

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

COMPANY APPRECIATION

Having the COMPANY APPRECIATION motive means you want your company to value you both as an employee and as a person. You also want to value the relationship you have with your company, and you are motivated when you feel like your contribution matters to the organization’s greater goals. You best engage when your company, through management and colleagues, recognizes your performance. When it comes to receiving appreciation, rewards have an added dimension of value for you, because they affirm your worth to your organization. Gestures of appreciation – whether small or large – also demonstrate regard for your performance and hard work. When you know that your workplace values you, your confidence improves; you have a sense of forward motion and satisfaction. You thrive when you can see that your particular contribution to your company is important and appreciated. When you are taken for granted, or your work goes unacknowledged or unused, it will negatively impact your motivation and well-being. In an ideal situation, COMPANY APPRECIATION is normal in your company culture, and a reliable fixture of your work experience. You excel and engage in an environment that gives you the message that you are professionally and personally relevant; you know this is true when your company shows it appreciates you.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Company Appreciation

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Company Appreciation

Motive Summary
Motive Satisfaction
Meeting Motives Questions
Leaders Questions & Tips
How to use: Motive SummaryHow to use: Motive Summary
This is the high-level summary of each motive that is included in a person’s motive results. Given motives are personal, they are “in the eye of the beholder,” motive explanations provide a brief foundation for context, but the nuances behind them will be person specific.

SELF-ESTEEM

The SELF-ESTEEM motive relies on an interplay of internal and external experiences of respect and value. Validation from management and your peers is important to you, it reinforces that you are making a valuable contribution to others. At the same time, you also need self-respect and confidence, regardless of outside affirmation. You thrive when you demonstrate your capacity to complete tasks well and can capably use your own talents and skills. Additionally, one of your strongest motivations to perform is being heard and valued. You have thoughts, ideas, and opinions that you want to share, and which you hope others will want to hear. You like feeling that what you bring to the table is both unique and useful, and you enjoy roles that make you feel a sense of importance. This “importance” does not have to be grandiose. Rather, you want for your role, however large or small, to make a difference to your company’s objectives, to the people you work with, and to your own sense of significance. When this motive is met, you feel confident and valued at work. When it is at risk, you’re liable to spend energy trying to guard or defend your role and your worthiness. This drains energy away from your capacity for powerful productivity. You desire to feel that what you do every day matters, and you hold a deep-seated conviction that what you do can matter. The more positive your self-regard, and the more your colleagues see your contributions as meaningful, the more authentically and productively you are able to show up in the workplace.

How to use: Motive SatisfactionHow to use: Motive Satisfaction
A quick and easy way to think about evaluating the health of the motive.

You feel this motive being met when...

This motive is risk when...

How to use: Meeting Motives QuestionsHow to use: Meeting Motives Questions
These are questions that are meant to be asked of team members who have each motive. Select a few questions based on each person’s unique top 5 motives. Send the questions to each employee before you meet so they have time to reflect. Then schedule a one-on-one or small team meeting where you can discuss their thoughts and responses.

A Work Wellness Check-in for Self Esteem

How to use: Leadership Questions & TipsHow to use: Leadership Questions & Tips
These questions and tips are for you to reflect on as a leader so you can support, encourage and better understand the motives of the people who work for you.

A Leadership Check-in for Self Esteem